House Mountain Partners

EVs

Lithium Q1 2017 Review and Risks - The Train Keeps a Rollin'

Chris Berry3 Comments

By Chris Berry (@cberry1)

 

As I’ve discussed before, all commodities are cyclical and the Energy Metals are no exception. Anecdotal evidence suggests that battery grade lithium pricing remains healthy in the $14,000/t USD range even as lithium share price returns have moderated from their triple digit returns in 2016. Despite this, lithium shares continue to post impressive gains. Year to date in 2017, an equally weighted basket of lithium names I track has returned 45.1%. This is compared to a return of 5.98% for the SPX, 2.42% for the TSX, and 4.07% for the ASX.  

Here are the year-to-date returns for select lithium names sorted by USD market cap:

Strategic Overview of the Cobalt Market

Chris BerryComment

It's been a busy few months and I'm pleased to announce that I've completed a thorough review of the cobalt market which is available for purchase. 

The report covers all aspects of the cobalt supply chain from mining, to refining, to end uses with supply and demand forecasts as well. 

I'm offering the Executive Summary and a portion of the Introduction for free. You can download a PDF version here. The cost of the full report is $500 USD which can be paid through PayPal (or we can make arrangements for a wire if necessary). As an added bonus, I'll give the first 20 people to purchase the report an opportunity for a 20 minute phone call to ask any question they want regarding the outlook for the cobalt market. 

To be clear, this is not a "stockpicking" report and so you won't find any "flavor of the month" stock picks here. What you will find is in depth data and insights into the cobalt supply chain and how the companies along it are shifting their business to capture the anticipated high growth of downstream industries. 

For more info on purchasing the report, please email me at info@house-mountain.com.

Thanks,

Chris

Lithium in Las Vegas: A Closer Look at the Lithium Bull

Chris Berry3 Comments

By Chris Berry (@cberry1)

 For a PDF of this note, please click here

 

I'm just back and recovering from a week in Las Vegas where the 8th Annual Lithium Supply and Markets Conference hosted by Metal Bulletin took place. Sentiment in the industry is overwhelmingly positive as the ubiquity of technology and the cost deflation associated with that technology (EVs, consumer electronics) means that lithium ion battery chemistry will remain central to this growth. The event was attended by  major lithium producers including Albemarle (ALB:NYSE), SQM (SQM:NYSE), and FMC (FMC:NYSE), cathode manufacturers, investment professionals, and junior mining companies, so coming away with a clear view of the market was facilitated.

It looks like my demand estimates of ~270,000 tonnes LCE by 2020 will be met. Supply, on the other hand, is always a wild card in the mining sector and my proprietary estimates

Are Electric Vehicles About to Jump The Shark?

Chris BerryComment

By Chris Berry (@cberry1)

For a PDF version of this note, please click here

 

As if vehicle electrification needed any more hype, Apple Inc’s. (AAPL:NASDAQ) rumored move towards producing its own EV by 2020 may have been the first sign that the whole idea of EVs has “jumped the shark.” For those of you unaware of this term, it refers to the 1970’s sitcom Happy Days when Fonzie was waterskiing and literally jumped over a shark. Happy Days was never the same and the show never quite recovered from this stunt to win viewers.

The rumors leaked last week about AAPL secretly working on developing its own EV have fanned intense speculation about how this would be accomplished. With $170 billion in cash on its balance sheet, obviously hiring the talent and research and development are non-issues. 

 

The Quiet Resilience of Energy Metals

Chris BerryComment

By Chris Berry

 

Despite their small size (in terms of yearly production) relative to base metals or fertilizers, many of the Energy Metals which I follow continue to make their strategic significance felt. We have talked a great deal in recent months about global excesses in labor and capital putting a “lid” on commodity demand. A confluence of geopolitical and economic issues has come to the fore which has only, I think, strengthened this thesis but has also paradoxically helped Energy Metals reassert their significance in global supply chains.

 

When it Happens…It’ll Happen Fast

The phrase above was said to me once by a money manager commenting on one of the main questions we have been asking ourselves in recent months. Namely, “When will this cycle turn?” With respect to Energy Metals, we could very well be at that tipping point.

 

Tesla Motors (TSLA:NASDAQ) - On The Verge of Changing Everything, But Questions Remain

Chris BerryComment

By Chris Berry

 

Charging Ahead

Last week, TSLA released its Q2 2014 earnings. As a proponent of disruptive business models and the raw materials necessary to enable the upheaval, I always listen with rapt attention. The earnings of $0.11 per share on net income of $16 million (non-GAAP), and a loss of $0.50 per share on net income of $62 million (GAAP) were enough to satisfy the market and after a brief dip in after hours trading, the share price rebounded strongly.

As is the case with many of the early-stage companies I follow, I’m more interested in production metrics, though revenue here is accelerating, indicating that TSLA is having no problem selling its cars. I’m willing to tolerate negative earnings and cash flow as long as the company is investing in future growth and increasing sales.

This is clearly the case with TSLA which reported record production (8,763 Model S) and deliveries (7,579 Model S) in Q2 and is on track for more than 35,000 deliveries in 2014 with the stated goal of 100,000 deliveries by the end of 2015. Additionally, with a Cap Ex guidance of $850 million, TSLA has a Cap Ex/Sales ratio of over 20% - unparalleled in the automotive business according to the FT. The next closest is Jaguar at 12%. TSLA is clearly a company in its early growth phase.

Rather than dissect the numbers here, I think it’s important to look at the main takeaways from the call and consider any questions that arise for the company as they continue on an exciting journey to revolutionize the automotive and energy storage businesses.  

The Lithium Market - Desperate for Disruption

Chris Berry

By Chris Berry

 

Separate and Unequal

In a note I wrote last week, I discussed the danger in assessing all critical metals together rather than individually. I am just back from serving as the Chair of the 6th Lithium Supply and Markets Conference hosted by Industrial Minerals. Of the many takeaways, this idea of analyzing the prospects for these metals separately is no more evident than in the case of lithium.

In the wake of Tesla’s (TSLA:NASDAQ) Gigafactory announcement, many lithium junior companies, who were left for dead, were given a new lease on life.  I have written in the past about the challenges I think must be overcome to make the Gigafactory a reality, and am still unconvinced that a junior mining company not close to production can participate and benefit its shareholders, but we shall see. I try and make a habit of not betting against terminally successful visionaries like Elon Musk.

It is clear that the automotive sector is the real growth driver for lithium, as David Merriman of Roskill pointed out in his remarks: